Woods Available

Because all of the furniture we offer is American made, it is made from American species of hardwood that you recognize.  Each type of wood has its own characteristics.  In addition, all of the woods, however, can be stained in a wide variety of finishes to meet your specific needs.  Here is a list of the woods we offer and a bit about each:

 

 

Red Oak

Red Oak

Red Oak –  This is an example of the grain pattern of plain sawn red oak.    This is what most people think of when they think of what oak looks like.  The hardness of red oak is 1290.

 

 

Quarter-Sawn White Oak

Quarter-Sawn White Oak

White Oak – This is an example of quarter-sawn white oak.  Unlike the plain sawn oak shown above, the quarter-sawing the oak results in a straighter grain pattern with ray and fleck figures in the wood.  This is the cut of oak that is typically used in the highest quality of Craftsman style furniture, both new and old.  The hardness of white oak is 1360.

 

Brown Maple

Brown Maple

Brown Maple – The visual appearance of brown maple is similar to alder wood.  There are a natural range of grain colors in brown maple which are evident in the lighter stains.  The darker you stain brown maple the more is resembles the same color stain on cherry wood.  The hardness of brown maple is 950.

 

Hard Maple

Hard Maple

Hard Maple – Unlike brown maple, hard maple has a more uniform light color.  This makes it particularly suited to a natural finish or a very light color stain.  Because it is such a dense wood it doesn’t accept the darker stains very well.  The hardness of hard maple is 1450.

 

Cherry

Cherry

Cherry – An even-grained wood which is considered to be the finest of the fruitwoods.  It is important to note that cherry wood darkens with age which results in a deep, rich patina.  The hardness of cherry is 950.

 

Rustic Cherry

Rustic Cherry

Rustic Cherry – This is simply the same as “regular” cherry wood, however, the boards with knots are retained and used in building the furniture.  The “non-rustic” cherry wood has all of the boards with knots removed from the pile.  You can choose to have the knots filled for a smoother resulting surface or left unfilled for the most rustic look.  The hardness of rustic cherry is 950.

 

Hickory

Hickory

Hickory – A close but open grained wood that resembles oak but the grain pattern is a bit more refined.  It is one of the hardest woods found in the United States.  The hardness of hickory is 1820.

 

Walnut

Walnut

Walnut – A dense wood whose natural color is a light to deep colored chocolate-brown.  It is a slow-growing wood and is one of the finest cabinet woods.  The hardness of walnut is 1010.